About Stephanie Grimm

Art and Art History Librarian at George Mason University

ADSL Division Meeting Minutes, New Orleans 2017 conference

With apologies for the delay: you can now find our ARLIS/NA 2017 division meeting minutes online: http://bit.ly/2nodEx

 

 

 

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Join the ADSL Hangout this Thursday!

Looking for a great way to stay involved in ARLIS/NA and ADSL between conferences? Join us this Thursday, March 30th at 3pm EST/12pm PST for our first Art & Design School Library Division Hangout!

For this initial Hangout, we’re looking for topics and potential contributors for future ADSL discussions, events, and collaborations. If you have an idea for a conference panel or other presentation, or if you just want to listen in, this will be a chance to brainstorm and vote on what you want to see ADSL do in the coming year.

We hope to use Hangouts as a way to gather and discuss throughout the year, so this first meeting is a great no-pressure situation to test out the tech and get yourself familiar with the new Google Hangouts (through YouTube). The first part of the discussion will be orienting people to the tools available, so don’t worry if you’ve never done this before!

Just click this link when it’s time to join us Thursday March 30th — it’s that simple! https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/q7jmtoqvrjfjxptudhtbkbjewue(Tip: paste the link right into a calendar appointment so you don’t have to hunt for this e-mail later.)

How it works:
We’ll all gather in a Hangout and discuss our ideas. If multiple people want to talk at once, we can use the text chat sidebar.  When someone wants to present an idea to the group we can turn Presenter status over to you, and everyone will see either your face or a screen share.  The resulting discussion will be captured as a YouTube video which won’t be publicly searchable, but will be shareable with a link.

Can’t make it to the Hangout?
If you have any questions or concerns about this Hangout, or have suggestions for future ADSL events, you can let the moderators know directly. We’ll send a poll after the Hangout to collect more votes on topics, too.

We look forward to seeing you all then!

Mark your calendars! ADSL Afternoon Chat: Instruction and Assessment

ADSL Afternoon Chat: Instruction and Assessment in Art & Design Libraries

Wednesday, October 26, 3pm EST // 12pm PST (via GoToMeeting)

Link to chat: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/262611149


Join the ADSL for an afternoon chat on Wednesday, October 26 from 3-4pm EST/12-1pm PST. Our conversation will focus on issues with teaching and assessment in art and design school libraries, as students and learners navigate the studio, the classroom, and professional spaces.

Prior to the chat, ADSL will share a set of guiding questions to shape the discussion, as well as a “recommended reading” list. We’ll post further details closer to the chat date; in the meantime, if you have a suggested reading or question to address, please share it in the comments!

Questions to consider:

  • What do you think are the biggest challenges to teaching to artists and designers (or in an art & design context) as compared to more traditional applications of library/information literacy instruction?
    • Resources — both for teaching support and research tools?
    • Faculty expectations?
  • What are some of the opportunities with teaching in these settings? What makes this interesting and exciting?
    • What innovative approaches or tactics can we employ?
  • How are the needs of student artists and designers changing (if at all), and how does instruction adapt to these changes?
  • Does your library have a formalized program for assessing library instruction?
  • How do you assess the impact of instruction when the output may not be a traditional research paper or project?

 

Suggested Readings:

Wang, Rui. “Assessment for One-Shot Library Instruction: A Conceptual Approach.portal: Libraries and the Academy, vol. 16, no. 3, 2016, pp. 619-648. (Alternate link: OA preprint version)

Gendron, Heather and Sclippa, Eva. “Where Visual and Information Literacies Meet: Redesigning Research Skills Teaching and Assessment for Large Art History Survey Courses.” Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, vol. 33, no. 2, 2014, pp. 327-344.

Halverson, Aniko. “Confronting information literacy in an academic arts library.” Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, vol. 27, no. 2, 2008, pp. 34-38.

Murphy, Sarah Anne. “How data visualization supports academic library assessment: three examples from The Ohio State University Libraries using Tableau.” College & Research Libraries News, vol. 76, no. 9, pp. 482-486, 2015.

Reale, Michelle. “‘Hands-off’ teaching: facilitating conversation as pedagogy in library instruction.Digital Pedagogy Lab, 28 September 2016.

ALA Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) Top Twenty: 2015’s best library instruction articles.

 

Mark your calendars! ADSL Afternoon Chat next Tuesday

ADSL Afternoon Chat: Makerspaces and Alternative Modes of Outreach in Art & Design Libraries

Tuesday, August 2, 3pm EST // 12pm PST (via GoToMeeting)


Join the ADSL for an afternoon chat on the topic of makerspaces and alternative modes of outreach and engagement next Tuesday, August 2 from 3-4pm EST/12-1pm PST. Whether you’re a veteran of the maker movement or a true newbie, you’re invited to bring your questions, ideas, and experiences with adapting library spaces to foster art practices and experimentation.

Prior to the chat, ADSL will share a set of guiding questions to shape the discussion. In the meantime, you can learn more about makerspaces and alternative engagement below. (Want to suggest a reading? Let us know in the comments!)

Link to meeting: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/825326981

Questions to consider:

  1. How do you or your institution define “makerspaces” and other initiatives for active,  “real-time” learning in the library? (Or, what do you think should be the intent of makerspaces?) How might these notions differ between art & design schools and more traditional academic institutions?
  2. How have you adapted or created new library services to serve the evolving needs of artists and makers? How do you keep abreast of new modes of creation and scholarship in the arts (e.g. new media, digital humanities projects) to be able to adapt or develop library services?
  3. Within your academic community, who are the most frequent users or participants in these spaces or outreach services? Who do you wish were a greater presence, contributor, or collaborator?
  4. How do you assess the impact of your makerspaces and outreach? What are your metrics for success?
  5. What are the potential critical issues with makerspaces and other forms of project-focused learning spaces in libraries? What can makerspaces, beta spaces, and other creative library spaces do to foster critical inquiry and scholarship, where learning extends beyond the tools and continues even after the “thing” is made?

Recommended Readings:

Dickerson, Madelynn. Beta Spaces as a Model for Recontextualizing Reference Services in Libraries. In the Library with the Lead Pipe, May 2016. http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2016/reference-as-beta-space/

Educause. 7 Things You Should Know about… Makerspaces. Educause Learning Initiative, 2013. https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/eli7095.pdf

Lotts, Megan. Lego Play: Implementing a Culture of Creativity & Making in the Academic Library. ACRL Conference Proceedings 409-418. http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7282/T3C53NJD